Thursday, November 19, 2015

Living Wills And The Terry Schiavo Case (part 1 of 2)

The story about Terry Schiavo and the court battles that her family and husband had to endure spread all over the country. Its exposure on the news had opened people's minds about living wills and how these documents could save them from a great deal of suffering and difficulties. On top of that, it changed the perceptions of Americans about death in general.

If the patient – Terry Schiavo – had drawn up a living will prior to her ill-fated collapse that led to severe brain damage, the expensive and highly publicized court hearings would have been avoided.

The painful question of whether to continue the provision of life-sustaining measures, in the form of tube feeding, should have been immediately answered by none other than Terry herself.

When a judge reached a decision to remove the feeding tube, the patient's husband – Michael Schiavo – made it a point to publicly endorse the importance of making a living will. This written, legally binding document would have saved him and his wife's family from all the trouble and painful struggles of deciding for the patient – based on their individual points of view about the situation.

After the case had closed, numerous Americans began to accept the harsh and inevitable reality of illness to the point of powerlessness – and consequently death. For this reason, more and more eligible folks had decided to draw up their own living wills and put their health care preferences down on paper. Basically, people had become more informed with regard to the issue and what they can do to avoid falling into the same difficult spot.

What is a living all about?

If you're still not well-versed about how living wills work, then you better expand your knowledge about these legal documents as early as possible.

No comments:

Post a Comment