Thursday, November 19, 2015

Living Wills And The Terry Schiavo Case (part 2 of 2)
In essence, it is a form of advanced directive that is written down on paper for the health care team to follow once the creator becomes too sick or incapacitated to communicate his or her decisions about treatment. In this way, the attending physicians and the immediate family would know whether the patient would like to receive "heroic measures" or to discontinue all types of life-support measures completely.

A living will may be viewed as a legal expression of your desires with regard to medical treatment. You may also appoint someone to be in-charge of deciding on your behalf in case the need arises. That person is usually called a "health care surrogate" or a "patient advocate".

When talking about living wills, the question of timing usually comes up. People normally want to know when it would be best to make a living will. The answer is pretty simple. Since state laws govern the making of living wills, the policies in one state may differ in another. Nevertheless, the standard rules involve the following qualifications: legal age and sound mind.

In most states in the U.S., the legal age is 18 years old and above. Then again, some states have set the benchmark a year older – at 19 years old, so be sure to determine these technicalities before deciding to write your own living will. Aside from the age, certain measures must be done as well.

In order for the living wills to be valid, the appropriate form must be filled out and the procedure must conform to the laws of the particular state you live in.

Some states necessitate the attendance of two qualified witnesses during the signing of the living will. The law may also require the presence of a Notary Public, together with the two onlookers.

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